Investment Types

Compare your investment options.

Scotia iTRADE® clients can choose from a wide range of investment types.

Use this helpful investment table to compare the different investment choices available to you. From equities/stocks, bonds, ETFs, or mutual funds, the choices available to you are vast. This comparison can help you determine what your best investment option is based on your needs, time horizon to invest, and risk tolerance.

Investment comparison

Investment Type Investment class Diversification Management fees Trading commission Intraday pricing movement Minimum investment Taxation Maturity/
expiry
Risk/Return
Stocks Equity No No Yes Yes No Capital gains; Dividends No Higher
ETFs Equity/debt Yes Yes Yes Yes No Capital gains; Dividends; Distributions No Medium
Mutual funds Equity/debt Yes Yes No No Yes Capital gains; Distribution No Medium
Options1 Equity No No Yes Yes No Capital gains Yes Highest
Bonds and debentures Debt No No Yes Yes Yes Capital gains; Interest Yes Lower
New issues2 Equity/debt No No No No Yes Capital gains; Interest; Dividends Yes2 Higher
Precious metals Commodity No No Yes Yes No Capital gains No Higher
GICs Debt No No No No Yes Interest Yes Lowest

Investment descriptions

Each share of stock represents a unit of ownership in a public corporation. Owners of common shares are typically entitled to vote on the selection of directors and other important matters.

Learn more

Built like mutual funds, ETFs consist of a portfolio of investment products, but they trade like individual stocks on major stock exchanges and can be bought or sold at any time throughout the trading day.

Learn more

An open-end investment vehicle that pools investors' money to invest in a variety of stocks, bonds, or other securities. A mutual fund issues and redeems shares to meet demand, and the redemption value per share is the net asset value per share.

Learn more

A contract giving either the right or the obligation for the purchase or sale of a specific security at a specific price during a specific time period.

Learn more

Debt instruments usually issued by a Government or a Corporation. Bonds are typically secured by specific assets, while debentures are secured only by the issuer's promise to repay. The buyer is paid interest, usually semi-annually – this is the buyer's return or yield on the debt instrument. Upon maturity, the buyer is repaid their original investment at face value.

Learn more

 

An IPO, or Initial Public Offering, is the issuance of securities by a company for sale to the public for the first time. A company that has already gone public can also offer a New Issue of additional securities. Typically, companies use IPOs & New Issues to raise capital for future business opportunities, pay down debt or to finance corporate activity.

Learn more

 

Gold and silver certificates can help diversify your portfolio and also qualify as investments in tax-deferred accounts, such as RRSPs and RIFs.

Learn more

A safe and secure investment which offer a guaranteed rate of return over a fixed period of time. They are issued by chartered banks or specific financial institutions (mortgage, loan and trust companies) and typically range in maturities from one to five years, though shorter maturities can also be found.

Learn more